News

 April 4, 2017: HONOR & COMPASSION DRIVE JASON BRODEUR

Central Florida Post: If someone had to pick three words to define Jason Brodeur’s political and professional body of work…Steadfast. Loyal. Pragmatic. Those three words expertly define Mr. Brodeur and for good reason.

From his first campaign for State House, to his leadership with the Seminole Chamber of Commerce, he has attained great power and remained humble throughout.

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As a lowly TeenAge Republican who just got elected to lead my high school’s club, we were all looking for volunteer efforts to earn experience. Local political campaigns were a great way to do that.

Being the Chairman, I was responsible for selecting the candidates our club would help, among them Jason Brodeur’s primary campaign for the GOP nomination in Sandy Adam’s former House District 33 in 2010.

We soon found out that many candidates took advantage of eager students looking to earn their stripes. And to disrespect the people who are winning you the election… that is a sign of someone who values puts themselves before others.

Jason Brodeur was not one of these candidates. His team was lead by notable Orlando Dandy Jon Yapo, who now serves in a high-ranking advisory role with Foley & Lardner.

Both Brodeur and Yapo took time to show us how to interact with voters, understand their concerns, and to absorb the things they hoped to see in their elected officials. Many people see political office as a tool for personal ascension, but Mr. Brodeur entered politics with an entirely different philosophy; he wanted to make Floridians lives better.

How a candidate treats their unpaid “grunts” tells you everything you need to know about their honor, compassion, and worldview. Brodeur demonstrated early on that service came before self, that teamwork was more important than the personal showboating we see with many politicians.

Since entering the Florida House, Representative Brodeur has fought to make government work harder, faster, and more efficient for his constituents. He fought to remove it from the equation when it ran counter to those goals.

Improving Floridians access to healthcare, slashing regulations, lowering taxes.

The difference between him and others who might try to replace David Simmons in Florida 9th Senate District? Brodeur exemplifies the “service before self” mentality we all so desperately want to see from our elected officials.

A successful healthcare executive, he has never needed the job or the money, and in a citizen legislator state, that is exactly what we need.

Now… many people might announce before the primary in 2020. Eager for a job and for true power, they will come. However, none will posses the kindness and understanding that voters have received from Jason Brodeur.

Many wanted him to march North and bring honor to that cesspool we call Washington, D.C. Thankfully, for now, he decided otherwise.

With many of the old guard in the GOP reaching term limits or moving on to greener pastures, a leadership vacuum will occur in the state legislator. We need people like Jason Brodeur to step into those roles.

Floridians don’t want this vacuum to be filled by self-serving and scheming political opportunists.

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March 6, 2017: Jason Brodeur raises $405K in February for State Senate D9 Bid

Orlando Business Journal: State Representative Jason Brodeur has raised about $405K for his State Senate District 9 bid in February according to state campaign finance reports.

Brodeur’s personal campaign finance account brought in about $87.5K, which brings him over the century mark when added to his January totals which began later that month. He has essentially all of it on hand.

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The “Friends of Jason Brodeur” PAC brought in about $318K, with $282K on hand when the other figures are totaled in since the PAC was established almost a year ago.

The Sanford lawmaker currently represents House District 28, which includes a large portion of the State Senate District he’s currently seeking in 2020. Incumbent Senator David Simmons has announced he’ll be running for higher office or will return to the private sector when his current term is completed.

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February 14, 2017: 4 questions with Rep. Jason Brodeur on his bill for autonomous vehicles

Orlando Business Journal: A bill recently filed in the Florida House of Representatives regarding safety for autonomous vehicles soon may see a companion bill from the Senate and move forward in this legislative session.

Rep. Jason Brodeur (R-Sanford) filed House Bill No. 725 on Feb. 9, which removes a requirement that the person operating a vehicle in autonomous mode possess a valid driver’s license. Instead, the autonomous technology would be deemed the licensed entity, as previously reported by Orlando Business Journal.

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The bill states that autonomous vehicles must comply with traffic and motor vehicle laws, and in the event of a crash involving the vehicle, “the vehicle owner, or a person on behalf of the vehicle owner, promptly contacts law enforcement to report the crash.” The bill explains the steps one should take, if present, and the vehicle should do in such accidents.

Brodeur shared with OBJ why he sponsored this bill:

How will this bill, if passed, change any ongoing deals between organizations using autonomous vehicles? “ I can’t speak to any of the current deals as I don’t have access to specific business agreements, but what I can tell you is that this will open Florida roadways to self-driving technology that is nothing short of a game-changer for vehicle and roadway safety. Our previous language was unintentionally prohibitive to some models of AV deployment, and with this language, we seek to resolve that.”

Why did you sponsor this bill?“Self-driving vehicles have a tremendous potential to positively impact our state. Not only can we reduce fatalities on Florida roads, which is the first and most obvious benefit of self-driving vehicles, (more than 90 percent of all vehicle-related fatalities are caused by human error) but this technology also will open up transportation opportunities to populations who could benefit tremendously from it, like people with disabilities, the elderly, and even offering transportation access to historically underserved communities. “

What were the major concerns for autonomous vehicles?“One of the largest concerns is addressing language that is currently on the books, which does not contemplate the idea of a driverless vehicle. When these laws were written, the thought of a driverless car was still science fiction. So we need to decide which rules need to accommodate self-driving vehicles so they are deployed in a responsible and compliant way.”

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February 9, 2017: Jason Brodeur introduces autonomous vehicle legislation in Florida House

Florida Politics: Sanford House Republican Jason Brodeur announced Thursday he filed a bill related to autonomous vehicles.

HB 275 would streamline the process for rue self-driving vehicles on public roads in Florida.

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“With more than 90 percent of crashes in 2015 being the result of human error, autonomous vehicles have the potential to eliminate this error and transform the way we travel,” Brodeur said in a statement.  “I am proud to support HB 725 this session, as Florida is largely recognized as the nation’s leader in autonomous vehicle public policy.  But in order to maintain this position and encourage companies to begin testing and deploying in the Sunshine State, we must address the current laws governing motor vehicle operation that never contemplated a driverless future.”

As Brodeur mentioned, Florida is considered on the cutting edge when it comes to autonomous vehicle policy, strongly led by St. Petersburg GOP Senator Jeff Brandes, an unbridled enthusiast for the technology. Brandes originally sponsored legislation in 2012 encouraging the testing and study of automated vehicles in Florida.

Last year the Florida Legislature unanimously backed HB 7027, Brandes bill that made Florida the first state in the nation to legalize fully autonomous vehicles on public roads without a driver behind the wheel. “That’s a game changer,” Brandes said this past November in Tampa at an autonomous vehicle summit, claiming that the law makes every 30-year plan created by various state and local agencies “wrong.”

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January 26, 2017:  Jason Brodeur Kicks Off State Senate District 9 Campaign in Lake Mary

Orlando Political Observer: State Representative Jason Brodeur successfully kicked off his campaign for State Senate District 9 on Thursday night surrounded by colleagues and supporters at a reception in Lake Mary.

The Sanford Republican is making the jump to the Senate after serving House District 28 for the last several year. The two districts overlap meaning many of the voters who have casted their ballots for him in the past will be able to do so again. Incumbent State Senator David Simmons is considering a run for higher office potentially Florida Attorney General or Congress in District 7 which is expected to be competitive in 2018.

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Brodeur sees the Senate as an opportunity to continue his work on legislation that helps children.

“Over the past several years, we’ve handled a lot of legislation for those who have suffered some sort of calamity or are in a compromised situation that doesn’t allow them to help themselves.” said Brodeur “That’s what government and my Senate run is all about, helping those that can’t help themselves.”

In addition to friends that have helped him in previous campaign, there was a strong showing of fellow elected officials from Seminole County including State Representatives Scott Plakon and Bob Cortes, Seminole County Commissioner Bob Dallari, County Property Appraiser David Johnson, and Seminole County Republican State Committeewoman Susie Dolan.

Simmons’ support along with the support from fellow lawmakers bodes well for Brodeur in the right leaning seat. He’s also currently the President of the Seminole County Chamber of Commerce.

“We’re very luck to have the people that are supporting us, both this year and in previous years.” said Brodeur in closing.

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